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The Official Blog for At The Pool

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5 Coffee Shops Where You Can Get Work Done in NY

Brought to you by our NY Ambassador, Ana

What makes writing, reading, studying or coding more fun than when you do it at home? Doing it at a coffee shop where you’re surrounded by like-minded New Yorkers trying to get work done while enjoying a flavorful cup of coffee and a tasty pastry. If you’ve been searching high and low across the five boroughs for a laptop-friendly, Wi-Fi-equipped coffee shop with quality coffee served in a classy atmosphere, here are five places you should consider: 

Think Coffee

The name of this chain gives away its most important feature: inspiring New Yorkers who set out to engage in creative thinking. Think Coffee shops across Manhattan are ideal for studying, reading, or writing, particularly the West Village and Greenwich Village locations, where you can enjoy free WiFi, in addition to the fair trade coffee acquired directly from Nicaragua, Brazil, or Southern Ethiopia. They have five locations across the city.
Location and Features:
73 Eight Ave., West Village
Open M-F 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sat-Sun 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi
248 Mercer Street, Greenwich Village
Open M-F 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sat-Sun 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., accepts credit cards, Wifi

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Cafe Grumpy
This cafe serves exotic blends of coffee including Toarco Toraja from Indonesia, Chire from Ethiopia, Las Flores from Honduras, Maganjo from Kenya, and Heartbreaker Espresso – a blend mixing coffee beans from Honduras, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. They will surely inspire you to write great blog posts or papers, or zoom through that philosophy reading. If you’re planning to do work that requires the internet, Greenpoint is the place to be; it’s the only location with Wifi (which also happens to have a roastery).
Location and Features:
193 Meserole Ave., Greenpoint, Brooklyn
Open: M-F 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Sat-Sun 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi, roastery

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Birch Coffee
Birch Coffee’s Manhattan locations are ideal for working and studying. Whether you’re in Flatiron District, the Upper West Side or the West Village, you’ll find a shop that will satisfy your needs. For example, you can purchase a quality coffee from Kenya, Honduras with a side of homemade granola and yogurt or egg, cheese, arugula and goat cheese grilled cheese!
Location and Features:
750 Columbus Ave., Upper West Side
Open: Daily, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi

21 E. 27
th St., Fashion District
Open: M-F 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sat 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sun 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi

56 7
th
Ave., West Village
Open: Daily 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi

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Stumptown Coffee Roasters at Ace Hotel
This Portland-based cafe has been serving its New York customers exotic blends of fair trade coffee across the world since Labor Day 2009, when it opened in the lobby of New York’s Ace Hotel.  If you’re feeling adventurous, Stumptown also has a location in Greenwich Village, where you can enjoy public tastings at 2 p.m. 
Location and Features:
18 W. 29th St. image


Open: Daily, 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; cash only; WiFi
30 W. 8
th St.
Open: Daily - Espresso 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and the Brew Bar 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., accepts credit cards, Wifi

R&R Coffee
A coffee shop off the beaten path (unless you’re a regular in the Financial District), R&R Coffee has all the studying or working amenities (coffee, pastries, and Wifi) you may want. It’s also conveniently located five minutes away from South Street Seaport where you can take in the sights of Brooklyn across the water, especially now that the weather is finally getting warmer.
Location and Features:
76 Fulton St.
Open: M-F 6:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Sat 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Sun 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.; accepts credit cards, Wifi

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4 Amazing Camping Sites In Utah

Camping is one of the most popular tourist activities in Utah, with destinations like Deer Creek and Snow Canyon State Parks regularly receiving over 350,000 annual visitors, according to the Utah Department of Natural Resources. Utah boasts plenty of camping opportunities beyond the state parks, with national parks and local campgrounds also proving quite popular among visitors. Camping serves as a respite during backpacking trips and ATV adventures, as well as a form of recreation in its own right. From Kings Peak to Jordan Pines Campground, visitors can choose from a vast array of excellent camping destinations in the state of Utah.

Kings Peak

Kings Peak is one of Utah’s most popular backpacking destinations. As the highest point in the entire state, Kings Peak offers amazing scenic views. However, reaching this view requires quite a bit of strenuous hiking. The Kings Peak trip is not one that should be taken on by complete beginners. Intermediate and advanced backpackers choosing to enjoy this journey can enjoy comfortable backcountry camping near Dollar Lake. This is a popular place to stay the night, as it offers a nice view and reasonably comfortable sleeping conditions. Keep in mind the elevation at Dollar Lake is 10,785 feet; take precautions to avoid altitude sickness at this high elevation.

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Paiute ATV Trail

One of the most popular ATV destinations in the entire United States, the Paiute ATV Trail serves as an excellent introduction to off-road travel, although the trail also offers plenty of challenge for more experienced individuals. According to Marysvale.org, the trail follows several old roads winding through the Fishlake National Forest. The amazing scenery includes vast panoramas of old-growth forest, as well as frequent elk and deer sightings. Although backcountry camping is allowed in the Fishlake National Forest, many visitors prefer staying at Lizzie and Charlie’s RV and ATV Park. The equipment requirements for this approach are less extensive, particularly as travelers can use an online store for ATVs to gear up.

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Weber County Memorial Campground

Located near Ogden, Weber County Memorial Campground is an excellent destination if you’re looking to enjoy a basic camping trip with your friends or family. The park is home to sixty individual campsites, as well as three large group areas that accommodate more than 200 visitors. Other amenities at the park include running water, a volleyball area and electricity access at the large group sites. What’s more, Weber County Memorial Campground is located near the Causey Dam, a popular destination for fishing and boating.

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Winter Camping At Jordan Pines Campground

Many hardcore outdoors enthusiasts dream of winter camping in Utah. This can be a life-changing experience, but it requires a great deal of advance preparation. Jordan Pines Campground is one of the few Utah sites in which winter camping is actually allowed. However, as the United States Forest Service clarifies, you’ll need to apply for a winter camping permit prior to your trip. The best months for winter camping are November and December, although, depending on weather conditions, you may be able to camp in January and February. Be aware that there is great potential for avalanche activity. You are advised to participate in an avalanche awareness and skills course prior to your vacation.

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Written by: Ruth Johnson - Advertising copywriter, sports freelancer, outdoor adventurer

7 Uncovered Places To Visit In NY

Brought to you by our NY Ambassador, Ana

Just when you thought you know New York like the back of your hand, you stumble upon a new area to explore or hidden place to discover that will make you fall in love with the City all over again. Here are seven such off-the-beaten path treasures: 

1. Roosevelt Island
A residential community filled with parks with extraordinary views of Manhattan, Roosevelt Island has come a long way from its original purpose: to host prisons, poor houses, and hospitals. Now, you can take in gorgeous views of the East River on the Western Promenade and see a 19th century lighthouse in a park at the northern end of the island. But if you’re looking for a truly memorable experience, your best bet is the Roosevelt Island Tram, which glides over the East River and makes you feel like you’re flying into the City. 

Visit: Take the F train to the Roosevelt Island stop or take the Tram from E 60th street.

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2. Fire Island 

Located on the south shore of Long Island and enriched by a long history of waterfall hunting and shellfishing, Fire Island National Park is the ideal place to explore nature and history. The island hosts the abode of one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence — William Floyd’s estate “Old Mastic House” — dating back to the 1720s. The Island also has two 19th century lighthouses — one built on the westernmost end of the island in 1826, the other dating back 1858, with a revolving first oder Fresnel lens.
Visit: You can access Fire Island by ferry from mid-May to mid-October, from Bay Shore, Sayville, and Pathogue on Long Island. Fire Island Lighthouse and Wilderness Visitor Center are accessible by car year round.   

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3. Dead Horse Bay

Sounds weird, doesn’t it? The Bay received its name in the mid-1850s when horse-rendering plants that used the carcasses of horses and other animals in New York City to manufacture glue, fertilizer, and other products, surrounded this Brooklyn beach at the western edge of a marshland. Around the turn of the 20th century, the area was repurposed as a landfill. Today, you can find thousands of 100-year-old vintage bottles, old telephones, and other nostalgia collectors’  treasures in the sand. 

Visit: Take the 2 train to the last stop at Flatbush Avenue/Brooklyn College, then the Q35 bus going toward Rockaway. Get off before the Marine Parkway Bridge.

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4. The Hidden Subway Station at City Hall

As the NYC subway 6 train reaches its last stop at Brooklyn Bridge, it loops around to go uptown and passes through an abandoned City Hall station. Opened in 1904, the architecturally ornate City Hall station was intended to be a gallery showcasing commemorative plaques dedicated to those who built and designed New Yorks underground system. Unfortunately, the station closed its doors to the public in 1945 due to its low daily use and because of an unsafe gap on the platform. 

Visit: You can see the station if you become a member of the MTA Transit Museum

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5. The Library Bar in the NoMad Hotel
Inside the Flatiron District’s NoMad Hotel, you’ll find a two-level library connected to the hotel by a spiral staircase imported from the South of France. Featuring literature on topics including the history of New York and cocktails, the Library is a nostalgic place to spend your time by day and an extravagant cocktail destination by night. 

Visit: Take the 1, 2, F, M, or N, R trains to 1170 Broadway and 28th Street.

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6. Bizarre Bar 

If you’re in the mood for a French burlesque experience in New York City, visit Bizarre Bar, the year-old Brooklyn-based creation of French film director duo Jean-Stephane Sauvaire and Greg Babeau. The bar’s minimalist basement has seen many a dance night brought to life by carefully-curated R&B and ‘90s rap DJ-run playlists, eclectic, Tim Burton-esque decor, films like The Last Tango in Paris screened silently on a wall, and “killer cocktails,” according to The Gothamist.
Visit: Take the J, M, or Z trains to the Myrtle Avenue-Broadway stop and walk to 12 Jefferson Street (at Myrtle Ave), Brooklyn. 

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7. Please Don’t Tell (PDT) 

This Prohibition-era-inspired “speakeasy” cocktail lounge is cleverly hidden behind what appears to be a vintage phone booth inside Crif Dogs, an East Village fixture. Enter the phone booth and you’ll find high-end cocktails, a handpicked selection of wine and beer, and the chance to order food from Crif Dog’s menu. Call to make a reservation.
Visit: Take the 6 train to Astor Place or N or R to 8th Street-NYU and walk to 113 St. Marks Place, New York. 

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